My $20,000 Pit bull story!

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The recent headlines regarding the legislation in Montreal which passed the breed ban of Pit Bulls and Pit Bull type dogs is the subject of considerable controversy.   As a dog trainer who has worked with and owned Pit bull breeds, I feel it is my responsibility to not only explain breed bans but also expel some myths about this very misunderstood dog breed.

So what is Breed ban legislation?  Breed-specific legislation is a law passed by a legislative body pertaining to a specific breed or breeds of domesticated animals. In practice, it generally refers to laws pertaining to a specific dog breed or breeds.

According to the A.S.P.C.A. and other animal welfare groups,  there is no evidence that breed-specific laws make communities safer for people or companion animals.  The CDC strongly recommends against breed-specific laws in its oft-cited study of fatal dog attacks, noting that data collection related to bites by breed is fraught with potential sources of error (Sacks et al., 2000).   To learn more about why breed ban legislation does not work  click here .

We agree that banning an entire breed or mixes of that breed will not solve the problem of vicious dogs and will only cause more problems.  We cannot judge an entire breed on one or two vicious dogs, if that was the case we would be euthanizing all dog breeds.  Almost every breed of dog has had one that bites at one time or another. Many bites occur not due to the nature of a particular breed or that the breed is vicious but rather to the circumstances surrounding the bite. All dogs can bite, will bite, (given the right circumstances) and can be taught to bite (police/personal protection). The larger the dog, the more damage is done regardless of breed.  Once breed bans are put in place for one breed, they can easily be modified for other breeds.  Many dogs are mixed breeds or have a certain look, may not be the breed that is banned, but will be deemed as such.

When it comes to the Pit Bull breeds there are two types of people in the general public, those that hate pit bulls and those that love them.  The problem is, those that HATE them, REALLY hate them and are reluctant to educate on the breed. Those that LOVE  them, REALLY love them and are reluctant to educate on the breed. This leads to common misconceptions on both parts.  One group states all are vicious and unpredictable, the other group says they are all wonderful, it is just the way they are raised.  Neither is true.

When talking about Pit bull breeds, I speak from experience not only from a dog training perspective but also having owned a dog aggressive Pit bull.  Yes, me.  You see, before I was a dog trainer, I was a Pit bull lover and believed it was how they were raised that caused the problem, mean people doing mean things to make the dog mean…. right?  If given lots of love, and toys ,and beds, and pillows, and kisses, and puppy training and…….you get the idea. I could prove the haters wrong, right?

Her name was Bailey and the first mistake my husband and I made was getting a puppy from a backyard breeder in whom we did not know, but was referred to us by a friend.  They kept the male and female separate because “they would fight at times.”  We adopted Bailey at 8 weeks of age.  We had two adult dogs at the time, a Dalmatian and a Rhodesian Ridgeback mix who  had a lot of love and little training.  We enrolled Bailey in Puppy class as soon as possible.  She excelled and was the star of the class.  She was quick at picking up commands, exuberant when performing tasks, very engaged and passed with flying colors.  We were so proud.

We noticed that the puppy was rough when playing with our other dogs or when coming out of her kennel or from behind a door. We also noticed scrapes and cuts on her after she was playing with the other dogs even though she would lie with them and play nicely as well.  It concerned us so we brought it up to the trainer of the puppy class.  We were told to just let them “work it out” on their own, which we did.  Bad advice from an inexperienced trainer.

She got into her first fight with our Dalmatian shortly after the conclusion of the puppy class. She ended up at the vet, had sutures and a drain put in and a cone on her head.   This was the first of many fights she had with our dogs over the 5 years we had her. They are too numerous to describe every one in detail.    One fight ended with me at the hospital due to a partially amputated fingertip from a dog bite. In case you’re wondering,  it wasn’t her, it was the Ridgeback.  I got in the middle of a dog fight and in the midst of the chaos was bitten.   Bailey was never aggressive toward humans  and was very loving toward people and was a big cuddle bug but she was innately dog aggressive.

The older she became, the more reactive she became despite training efforts.  We consulted trainers and a dog behaviorist.  The sad end result was that we had to euthanize her for the safety of our other dogs. We estimate over the 5 years we spent with her, we spent about $20,000 in vet bills from fighting and hospital bills from my finger incident.  This dog is the reason my husband and I became dog trainers.  We wanted to learn about dog training and give educated advice to people so they would not have to suffer as we did from bad advice.

So here is the truth about Pit bull breeds and what I know for sure;

Pit bull is the common name for a type of dog. Formal breeds often considered in North America to be of the pit bull type include the American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, and Staffordshire Bull Terrier. The American Bulldog is also sometimes included. They are called “Pit” bulls because they are breeds that were bred to fight in a fighting ring called a pit.

Pit bull breeds are  high energy level dogs that do everything 100%. Whatever they do, they give it their all. Rather it be obedience, play, exercise, loving, snuggling or fighting, they are in it to win it.  They also have a high prey drive which can make them reactive to quick-moving objects.

The myth that Pit bulls are aggressive because of how they are raised is true to an extent but is contrary to what you are probably thinking.   Yes, there are bad people who do bad things to dogs which make them aggressive or vicious. However, we have seen many Pit bull owners that love and care for their dogs and  still have dog aggression problems.  We have seen many dogs that have been given only love with no leadership which also become unstable and aggressive toward humans as well as other dogs, regardless of breed.  Dogs are pack animals and need stable leadership. Without leadership a dog will try to assume the leadership role.  A dog that is not a born leader will not be confident. A dog that is not confident will become unstable and can exhibit behaviors such as separation anxiety, fearfulness,  or aggression.  If a dog senses clear leadership he can relax because the leader has everything under control. Dogs that have a lack of proper exercise, training, or mental stimulation can also become aggressive and unstable due to pent-up energy.

Another reason that a Pit bull breed can be aggressive regardless of how they are raised is in the lineage;

Pit bull breeds were originally bred and raised to fight for sport. The ones that were best at the sport would bite, hold and kill their opponent. They were originally bred by combining an English bulldog with some form of terrier.  The English bulldog gave them the strength, the terrier gave them the tenacity and high prey drive.  The English Bulldog  was also used to fight and kill other dogs but this has been bred out of them for over 200 years.  This is why you see much less dog aggression in the English Bulldog breed however it occasionally occurs.  Even today, Pit bulls are being bred for dog fighting sport in underground dog fights and gambling organizations.  Since Pit bulls are still being bred for dog fighting some are “hard-wired” to do the job they were bred to do.  Just as cattle dogs chase cattle, sheep dogs chase sheep, bird dogs flush birds, Pointers point……you get the idea, Pit bulls fight other dogs.  Therefore, without knowing the breeding past of the dog you adopt, you will not know how close to fighting stock he/she comes from.  The closer to fighting stock, the more likely the dog is to do that job.  It is innate, something you cannot control regardless of how much love or how much training they receive and it has nothing to do with how they are raised.

Pit bulls are generally not human aggressive as this was bred out of them from the beginning.  The handler had to be able to go into a fighting ring and pull the dog out of the ring without being bitten.  Those dogs that would turn and bite the handler, were destroyed.  This explains how, when a pit bull attacks another dog, he generally bites, holds and shakes the prey.

Many dogs will be dominant over one another but generally, if one shows submission, the other will not attack. Dogs in a dog pack will go through dominance rituals on a regular basis.  Fighting Pit bulls are bred to ignore cut off signals from other dogs, in other words, they will attack regardless of what signs of submission the other animal is giving.   This, along with high prey drive, the ability to bite and hold and the prevalence to do everything 100%  give way to the myth that Pit bulls have “locking” jaws. They do not, they are just willing, capable and good at what they were bred to do.

The myth that Pit bulls are all aggressive or untrustworthy and can “turn” at any time is also untrue and not a fair statement for the breed.   Many Pit bulls and Pit bull mixes are not hard-wired to do the job their ancestors were bred to do. Many live in loving homes, have loving personalities, have never had a bite history, and are true ambassadors of the breed.

So what do you do if you are thinking of adopting a Pit bull?  There are a few things that will make the decision easier and more predictable. First and foremost ask yourself why you want a Pit Bull.  Is it because you are an active person, love the look, exuberance and stamina of the breed, or is it to make a statement or to  prove a point that it is not how they are raised.  Second, do your research and decide if this breed is the right fit for your family.  Pit bull breeds have high energy requirements and need to be stimulated both mentally and physically.  If you are a couch potato, work long hours, live in an apartment or want a low energy dog, the Pit bull type is not the dog for you.

If you want to adopt a puppy only adopt from a reputable breeder.  Reputable breeders breed for health and temperament of the breed, have been doing so for many years even decades and can provide you  with the puppies lineage. If you buy from a backyard or inexperienced breeder, you will not know how close to fighting stock the puppies are from and will possibly be contributing to the problem.

If you want to adopt from  a rescue or shelter, pick one that can give you as much information as possible about the individual dog you are interested in.  It is a good idea to have a dog trainer go with you to help evaluate behavior and temperament.

When you adopt a Pit bull, provide consistent leadership, training and exercise.

If you have a Pit bull and it is exhibiting dog aggression or aggression of any kind, consult with a dog trainer or an animal behaviorist to decide the reason for the behavior and if it can be modified.

If you have a Pit bull that is dog aggressive and you have put training in place and have come to the conclusion that the dog is innately dog aggressive, the only responsible option is euthanasia.  We do not take euthanasia lightly and it is the hardest decision a dog owner will make.  As dog trainers euthanasia is never the advice we like to give but have given it. As a Pit bull owner it was the last decision we ever wanted to make but made it.

The answer to breed banning and to the pet overpopulation problem in general is not breed specific legislation but breeding legislation and spay/neuter policies.   Breeders should be licensed and proven to be reputable with strict guidelines.   All pets should be spayed and neutered unless a person is a licensed breeder. Individual dogs of any breed deemed and tested to be vicious should be euthanized.

A dog aggressive Pit bull and the owner of one suffer greatly.   Managing the problem means keeping the dog away from others ( which often makes the problem worse), always walking on eggshells, and hoping nothing goes wrong.  You will also be contributing to the problem and giving haters and proponents of breed ban fuel for their fire. You will be putting all of your effort and time keeping an unstable dog alive, when many other loveable, stable dogs, Pit bulls and otherwise are being euthanized daily due to lack of shelter space.  Sadly, we have to sacrifice the few to save the many.  If you love the breed and hate the breed ban, it is the responsible thing to do and the only thing that will save the Pit bull breeds.

It isn’t the breed, it is the humans because we created it, we have failed it, and it is time to be responsible and do all we can to redeem the Pit bull breeds.

 

Cindy Quigley is a Canine life cycle coach, owner of Super Mutts Canine training and author of Puppy Montessori. She has 20 years experience professionally working with dogs.  She has worked in grooming shops, boarding facilities and veterinary hospitals, all of which taught her how to read canine body language and understand dog handling. As boarding and daycare facility owners together with her husband Kenneth she has cared for thousands of dogs and has thousands of hours observing, studying and modifying canine behavior. She is an  AKC/ CGC, CGCU, Community Canine and S.T.A.R. puppy evaluator and a professional member of the Association of Professional Dog Trainers.

You can read more or purchase her book at www.supermutts.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

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3 reasons dog obedience doesn’t work!

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Properly trained, a man can be a dog’s best friend ~ Corey Ford

When it comes to training your dog, many people think of or have taken their dog to obedience classes.   Obedience is great in that it builds a common language between you and your dog. Obedience builds trust and respect between you and your dog. Obedience can help control a dominant dog and create confidence in an unsure dog. Obedience can also help keep your dog safe.  An obedient dog is more enjoyable in that he can join you on adventures outside the home and will listen to you in any situation.  Many people are involved in competition obedience which can be fun for both human and dog.

So, if obedience does all this, why is it that we have heard many people say, “I took my dog to obedience class but it didn’t stick.” There are three reasons why obedience classes do not work for some people.

  1. Most people will work with their dog during class and will do the homework for the six  weeks that the class is scheduled for.  After this time however, many people do not work with their dog daily if at all.  People assume that the six-week program is all their dog needs to learn how to be a “good” dog for the rest of its life.  This thinking is comparable to saying  children only need to go through kindergarten.  A dog’s training goes on for its entire life.  Basic obedience teaches a dog basic commands that you then use daily for their entire lives in many different situations.
  2. People are not consistent with the training.  They may do obedience “drills” with their dog but do not work the dog in other situations such as in public, when guests come over etc.  The dog quickly learns that the human is not consistent; he only has to do these obedience commands during the drills but at no other time. Dogs are contextual which means you have to work your dog in every situation that you want him to be obedient in.  Obedience should be used in every aspect of your dog’s life; when  you go to the park, to a friend’s house, out for a walk, in your neighborhood, or to the veterinarian.  Anywhere you take your dog , obedience should come into play.  This is how you get an obedient dog in any situation
  3. Leadership or behavioral problems, not obedience.  Obedience classes do not solve behavioral problems and sadly people wait until they are having behavioral problems to start an obedience program.  Obedience helps with leadership and behavioral issues but alone does not establish leadership. Obedience with a solid leadership program is what helps solve behavioral issues.

Case Study:

Several years ago, on a camping trip, was a woman that had rescued a large dog that she brought with her.  The dog was tied out on a corkscrew ground stake.  On two occasions, the dog lunged and tried to bite two people, one being a child.  Upon bringing it to the woman’s attention, she put her dog on leash and proceeded to do obedience drills to show “how obedient her dog was.”  The dog performed the drills as expected.  Despite the dog understanding obedience, the owner clearly used obedience improperly.  It was also clear that she did not establish a leadership program with the dog.  The dog has an aggression problem that obedience can help if used in the right context.  Most importantly, the owner needs to put a leadership plan in place in conjunction with obedience.

The proper way to handle this dog was first to never put the dog in a scenario in which he could potentially harm someone or behave in an aggressive manner.  You cannot change a dogs behavior if he is tethered thirty feet away from you.  The dog should have been tethered to the owner.  At times when this was not possible, he should have been kenneled.  While on leash, the human could work on sit/stay and down/stay while the dog was tethered to her and around other people.  She would have the ability to reinforce good behavior, create positive associations with people, and also the ability to correct unwanted behavior if necessary.  She could have taught the dog what is allowed and what is not allowed around people.  Instead, the dog learned nothing accept that after an outburst he had to do obedience drills.

Obedience can create a trusting bond between you and your dog. Obedience is a great way to teach your dog what behaviors are acceptable in your home and in society especially if started early, practiced often and in the right context.

So, the next time you find yourself or someone you know saying that obedience didn’t “stick”, stop and consider these three possible causes and adjust accordingly.

 

Cindy Quigley is a Canine life cycle coach, owner of Super Mutts Canine training and author of Puppy Montessori. She has 20 years experience professionally working with dogs.  She has worked in grooming shops, boarding facilities and veterinary hospitals, all of which taught her how to read canine body language and understand dog handling. She is an  AKC/ CGC, CGCU, Community Canine and S.T.A.R. puppy evaluator.

You can read more or purchase her book at www.supermutts.com 

How to be a pack leader

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A leader is one who knows the way, goes the way, and shows the way. ~John C. Maxwell

 

By becoming your dogs’ pack leader, you will set the stage for a more enjoyable life with your dog.  You will be giving your dog what he needs and in turn he will be much easier to manage and live with. Dogs that live in a dog pack do not develop the same behavioral issues of those that live with a human pack.  The cause of many behavioral problems  are from people “humanizing” their  dog. Humanizing a dog is one of the most detrimental things we can do to our dogs psyche.

When we compare a dog to a human, we cease to give him what he needs to be a dog.  We believe he thinks like a human so should act accordingly.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  A dog is an animal, he thinks like an animal and cannot rationalize like a human or understand what you are thinking, it is impossible.  You would not bring a wild animal into your home (such as a Mountain lion or Grizzly bear) and expect it to understand anything you said or thought, yet people do it with the dog every day. Dogs are domesticated and capable of learning words but are still an animal and need to be respected for what they are.

Becoming a pack leader will make a dominant dog less dominant and give a fearful or anxious dog more confidence.

Below is a list of what the term Pack leader means and how you can become your dogs’ pack leader.

There are two positions in the pack–  1) Leader 2) Follower.  In the eyes of your dog, if you are not one, you must be the other.  A dog that senses no leadership, and is not a born leader, will try to become one.  This can cause problems such as aggression, dominance or anxiety.  A dog that senses a clear leader can relax because he is not responsible for the life of the pack; someone else has everything under control.

The pack Leader is calm and assertive –  A dog will only follow calm assertiveness.  If you are angry, fearful, anxious or nervous your dog will not follow your commands.  Pack leaders are never unstable.  If your dog is not performing or paying attention to you, ask yourself what state of mind you are in and change it if necessary.  Never work with your dog when you are angry.

Pack leaders are dictators but are fair and consistent – The rules of the pack are set by the pack leader and never change. Everyone in the pack knows what is expected.  Do not give your dog one set of rules today and change the rules tomorrow.

Examples include:

  • one family member does not allow the dog on the furniture and another family member does.
  • You make the dog wait before going out of a door one day, and allow him to push his way through the door on another day.
  • You enforce proper leash walking in your neighborhood, but not in other places such as a park or on a trail.

All these things are inconsistent and will confuse the dog. BE CONSISTENT. All family members are part of the pack and everyone should maintain the same rules for the dogs.  All rules apply to all dogs in the pack.  There is not one set of rules for one dog and not the other.  Everyone is treated equally.

All canine relationships are built on 2 things –  1) Trust 2) Respect.  If your dog does not trust you, he will not listen to you. If your dog does not respect you, he will not listen to you.  If your dog is not listening, ask yourself if it is a trust issue or a respect issue and change your training accordingly.

Never do anything to break your dogs’ trust.  For instance – Never Call your dog to you to discipline him or do something he doesn’t like.  If you do this, he will be leery to come to you because he cannot trust that coming to you is in his best interest.  If you punish him for not coming, once he does come to you, you continue to break the trust.  Dogs will not follow someone they do not trust.  If he cannot trust you, you cease to be the pack leader.

Pack leaders do not negotiate and are confident in their decisions.  – If you are on a walk and are afraid of what your dogs might do when a person, animal, bike, car etc. passes by, you are not confident, the dog will sense this and will react accordingly. In a dog pack the lead dog makes a decision and sticks with it. He does not worry about what is ahead, nor does the rest of the pack.  They trust the leader to do what is in their best interest for the survival of the pack.  Know what you want the walk to look like and focus on that, not what you think the dog will do.  This will build both trust and respect from your dog.  If your dog knows you are in control, he can relax.

The Pack leader always protects the pack – Your dog needs to see that you control the situation so he does not have to.  If another dog is acting out or a child or new puppy is being too forward with your dog, it is the pack leaders (YOUR) responsibility  to stop the others from bothering or injuring your dog.  No bullies allowed. Again, if your dog sees that you are controlling the other pack members, he does not have to.

Pack leaders do not give unnecessary affection – Do not give your dog unnecessary affection.  Dogs need to earn affection.   Too much affection is not good for their psyche.  For instance – do not pet your dog and kiss your dog just for being in the room.  He must work for affection by obeying rules, walking on leash properly and being obedient.  If he is misbehaving and still getting affection, you are rewarding the misbehavior and he will continue to do it in the future.

The pack engages with the pack leader – In a dog pack, the pack members are always engaged with (watching)  the pack leader, regardless of what they are doing.  If the pack leader moves, they move. If the pack leader growls, pack members listen. Many problems people have with their dogs are due to lack of engagement.  The dog would rather sniff a bush, chase a bunny, bug, piece of grass , whatever, than look at and obey his owner.  If a dog does not engage with you, he neither trusts nor respects your authority. Engagement is built through leash work, obedience, rewarding good behavior and disagreeing with bad behavior.

Your dog is a reflection of you –  If your dog is misbehaving or not obeying, ask yourself “what am I doing that is creating this situation and what can I do to change it.”  You are a human with higher intelligence DON’T BLAME THE DOG and DON”T BE LAZY! Do the work!

If you apply these principles when interacting with your dog, soon they will come naturally and you will create a new way of being with your dog.  You will see that your dog will become more relaxed, happier and less anxious and with that, so will you!

Cindy Quigley is a Canine life cycle coach, owner of Super Mutts Canine training and author of Puppy Montessori. She has 20 years experience professionally working with dogs.  She has worked in grooming shops, boarding facilities and veterinary hospitals, all of which taught her how to read canine body language and understand dog handling. She is an  AKC/ CGC, CGCU, Community Canine and S.T.A.R. puppy evaluator.

You can read more or purchase her book at www.supermutts.com 

 

 

 

 

Alpha and NILIF

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A leader is one who knows the way, goes the way, and shows the way.

~John C. Maxwell

 

 What does it take to be the big dog, the leader? Not in size but in temperament. After all, size has nothing to do with being the “big dog” in the dog world. There are dogs the size of Rottweilers that are the “big dog,” but there are also dogs the size of Chihuahuas that are the “big dog.”

We want to take this time to talk about two terms that humans often misuse and misunderstand. One is the term “alpha,” the other is the term “NILIF,” or nothing in life is free. As dog trainers, we hear many people use both of these terms but when questioned on what they mean, they do not fully understand or sometimes have no clue what they really mean.

Alpha

 In our dog training, we seldom use the term “alpha.” We also never tell people they need to be the “alpha.” When we first meet people to help with their dogs we always discuss leadership and the importance of being a good leader to your dog. In our experience, when people hear the term “alpha,”

they assume it means being aggressive or dominant over your dog.  That  you should “force” your dog to submit to you. This thinking is the furthest from the truth.

In social animals, the alpha is the individual in the community with the highest rank. Male or female individuals or both can be alphas, depending on their species. Where one male and one female fulfill this role, they are referred to as the alpha pair. Other animals in the same social group may exhibit deference or other symbolic signs of respect particular to their species toward the alpha or alphas. In hierarchal social animals, alphas usually gain preferential access to food and other desirable items or activities, though the extent of this social effect varies widely by species. Male and female alphas may gain preferential access to sex or mates, and in some species, only alphas or an alpha pair is permitted to reproduce.

Alphas may achieve their status by means of superior physical prowess or through social efforts and building alliances within the group.

The position  of alpha  also changes in some  species, usually through a physical fight between a dominant and subordinate animal. Such fights may or may not be to the death, with relevant behavior varying between circumstance and species.

Many people use the term “alpha” to tell us that their dog’s aggressive or out-of-control behavior is because he is the “alpha.” This also is untrue. In fact, if your dog is acting outwardly aggressive or out of control, chances are it is because he senses no leadership and has not been provided with rules by you, the human. Dogs are self-serving opportunists, if you allow them to be bossy and it works for them, they will continue to do so. A bossy dog is a bossy dog, not an alpha dog.

In the dog world, there are only two positions, the leader or the follower. If you are not one, you are the other. Most dogs are not born “alpha” dogs. If they sense no leadership in the pack, they will automatically try to fill the role. If they are not a born “alpha dog,” they will be terrible at it and you will see aggressive or fearful behaviors. A true “alpha” dog is rarely aggressive. If you are ever in the presence of a true “alpha” dog, you will see that he commands respect by calm assertiveness, not aggression and certainly not severe aggression unless the situation merits, such as a threat to his life.

A true alpha dog does not need to act aggressively, because everyone in the pack knows he is the alpha or leader and will respect his authority based on his energy within the pack. The relationship is based on trust and respect. Others will rarely challenge his authority. He can give a simple glance and they know not to mess with him. Not necessarily because he was aggressive toward them, but because they understand the intention with a simple look, that if they pushed him he would correct them and they would lose….period. When an alpha dog enters into a pack of dogs, he will let them know his position simply by the way he walks into the group. He generally will enter without sniffing anyone and will be aloof to other dogs around him. Other dogs will often follow the “alpha” dog; the alpha rarely follows the rest.

The picture above is of the alpha male and alpha female dogs of our pack before they passed away. George and Sonora. George was never overly aggressive toward any of our pack of four or the hundreds of dogs we see in our business. He walked with self-assurance and head held high. When we brought in a dog for evaluation, we would use George and Sonora for the evaluation. We used the two of them for their ability to always be aloof and ignore other dogs.

George never had to become aggressive with our other pack members. When we brought home our bulldog puppy Rudy, he would often approach George if George was chewing a bone. As Rudy would approach the bone, George would give him a look. If he continued, George would curl his lip and occasionally growl. If Rudy continued to push it, George would quickly and accurately bite Rudy on his face, hard enough to make him yelp and walk away. The next time Rudy approached, all George had to do was give the look. Rudy would take heed. However, there were times when George was chewing a bone or toy and would let Rudy take it because he was not that interested in it any longer. Being alpha does not mean being a tyrant. It means being a leader, being fair, and setting rules and boundaries. The other dogs always knew when they could or could not take something the alpha pair had.

Sonora was clearly the alpha female of the dog pack. She would stand her ground by growling and showing teeth if she disapproved. She was the more vocal of the two and used it to her advantage. The other dogs would take heed and not push her. She also would share resources and would play with the others.

It became startlingly clear to us that George and Sonora were the pack leaders of the dog pack when they both died in the same week. Our pack used to hang out in our backyard, which they had access to through a doggie door. We would always find them lying on our deck or under a bush or tree. Once George and Sonora died, the two remaining dogs, Bentley and Rudy seemed lost. They stuck closer to us and went outside only to go to the bathroom. To this day, they do not use the backyard as they did when George and Sonora were alive. Neither Rudy nor Bentley is a pack leader.

Now, the reason we say that George and Sonora were the leaders of the DOG pack is because even though they were the leaders of the dogs, they respected us as leaders of them. They would rarely challenge our commands and would allow us to take anything from them. Not because we intimidated them by using forceful techniques, but because we established a leadership program with them—a fair, consistent leadership program based on trust and respect.

By using the Puppy Montessori program and establishing clear rules and boundaries, you are teaching your puppy what is acceptable in the pack and what is not, which builds respect. By rewarding good behavior and controlling the situations your puppy is in, you are building trust. This puts you in the leadership role. For example, If you do not want your dog on the furniture, you let him know by either never letting him on the furniture or by directing him off of the furniture and rewarding him for lying on his own bed. These daily rules are what will establish you as the pack leader.

NILIF (nothing in life is free)

 We cannot talk about leadership without talking about the NILIF program. NILIF simply means, “Nothing in life is free,” and it means just that.

NILIF is a consistent methodology that is based on action/reaction. Basically it means that your puppy has to do something before he gets something he wants. Where people fail at this concept is by allowing the dog to make all the decisions on his own. By making all the decisions on his own, he then assumes he is the leader. If he is not a born leader, this is where you will see issues such as insecurity or dominance. For instance, your dog wants to jump on the furniture, and he does so anytime the mood strikes. If he wants to play ball, he brings you the ball, and you throw it. He wants to be petted, he nudges your hand, and you pet him. He wants to eat, he barks at you at

dinnertime, and you feed him. All these things are the dog telling you to do something, and you do it. Bingo, in his mind, he must be the leader. This will also lead to a bossy dog.

The NILIF program was designed to put rules and boundaries in place to let your dog know that you are the leader of him, not the other way around. The first thing is to end all attention on demand. When your dog comes to you and nudges you to pet him or brings you a toy to play with, you ignore him. The only time you pet or play with your dog is when YOU initiate it. If he is sitting or lying away from you, call him to you and pet or play with him. Before you feed your dog or play with your dog he is to perform a task such as “sit” or “down.” If he wants to get on the furniture or bed (and you allow him on the furniture), he should have to ask by coming to you and sitting before you give the command to get on the furniture. If he wants to go outside, he should sit and wait before doing so.

So you see, for everything the dog wants from you, he first must perform an action to get the reward he wants. Remember the program is called NOTHING in life is free. It is not called SOME things in life are free and that is where most people fall short on this program. Some people will say they are implementing the NILIF program by making their dog sit before feeding, but they still pet the dog or give attention on demand. This is not NILIF.

Many people tend to be overly affectionate to their dogs. In fact, many of the problems we see in dogs stem from people who give their dogs too much free-flowing affection. We are not saying you should never be affectionate to your dog; we are saying you should not be overly affectionate. Too much affection can create a dog that senses no leadership and oftentimes creates an anxious or nervous dog or a dog that is aggressive or dominant. Your dog should always perform some task before getting affection and should never be allowed to demand affection.

Understand this is just a primer for the NILIF concept, not the complete program or description. Again, as with any training program, you must be consistent. If you allow your dog to jump up on the furniture or demand attention on one day, and not on another, you will be confusing the dog. In a dog pack, the rules do not change on a daily basis. If your rules change daily, your dog will be unsure about what those rules are, which will lead to confusion and distrust. Be consistent!

In conclusion, Raising a puppy is never an easy endeavor but if done right can be less frustrating than doing it wrong. The Puppy Montessori program is designed to help take the frustration out of puppy ownership, creating a better bond between human and dog that can last a lifetime, if not yours, definitely your dog’s.

Following are the twelve key components to the Puppy Montessori program:

Choosing the right puppy—It is “critical” to understand which puppy is right for you. Do your homework; raising a puppy should not begin with an impulse decision. (Chapter 1)

 Understanding developmental levels—Puppies are like children. Understand that they are going to go through different phases of development. It is important for you to understand how to correctly respond to these phases in your puppy’s development. (Chapter 2)

 Communicating—Do not talk too much! It is important not to use words until you understand and establish proper communication with your puppy. (Chapter 3)

 Setting up a nursery—Environmental controls are critical to your puppy’s development and the relationship you will establish with your puppy. The goal is to help set up you and your puppy for success. (Chapter 4)

 Potty training—Proper potty training will make or break your relationship with your puppy. Potty training issues are the number one reason puppies are rehomed. (Chapter 5)

 Socializing—Socialize early and socialize often using proper techniques.

(Chapter 6)

 Leash walking—Leash = Love. The leash is the artery to your puppy’s experience in the outside world. Dogs have four legs and are meant to walk. (Chapter 7)

 Obedience—Train early, Train often! Obedience is the heart of a healthy human/dog relationship. (Chapter 8)

Curbing destructive behaviorsIt is easier to train good behaviors than undo bad ones! Do not give too much freedom too soon. (Chapter 9)

 Health and wellness—A healthy dog starts as a healthy puppy. Proper nutrition, grooming, and vaccinations are the foundations to a happy, healthy dog. (Chapters 10, 11, 12)

 Proper play—Owning a puppy is not a game. Your puppy is constantly learning, even through play. Understand how to properly play with your puppy. (Chapters 13 and 14)

 Leadership is the key—Become the big dog: understanding alpha and NILIF. (Chapter 15)

Kenneth and Cindy Quigley are the Owners of Super Mutts Canine Retreat in Arizona. They are dog trainers and have fixed many broken dogs. They are the authors of ” Puppy Montessori, How to raise a puppy”  Cindy Quigley is also a dog groomer and has 19 years experience working with dogs professionally in veterinary offices, grooming shops and boarding kennels.

You can visit them through their website at http://www.supermutts.com

You can purchase Puppy Montessori through their website or on Amazon. Now available on Kindle!

 

It’s not the dog!

 

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While walking a clients dog yesterday, I heard these words coming from my neighbors garage, ” Trixie come here, come on , come on Trixie, You want to go bye bye don’t you? GET OVER HERE NOW!!”

This brought to mind the numerous times in our dog training business we have heard people say , “My dog does not listen to me.” Our response to this statement is always, “It’s not the dog.” Actually, the majority of training issues are not the dog. The real reason for many problems is lack ( of the human) teaching the dog to listen. Another reason is that people assume dogs understand the human language without ever teaching them this language. Lets break down the above scenario to better explain.

1) “Trixie come over here”

Mistake number one: The dog is not on leash.
Putting a leash on the dog gives you control and stops the dog from running away. The leash allows you to guide the dog into position.

Mistake number two: Too many words used.
“Trixie come over here” Is not a command. The dog clearly was not taught what the command “come” means. If the dog is not taught a command, she will not comply, she cannot perform what she was never taught. Even if she was taught the word, the man coupled it with a series of other words which confuses the dog.

Mistake number three: No motivation.
The man had nothing to reward the dog with and therefore no motivation for the dog to come to him. All the other fun things in the garage are much more rewarding to check out than the human who is saying words the dog doesn’t understand.

2) “Come on, come on Trixie”

Mistake number one: As stated above, coupling too many words together confuses the dog

Mistake number two: Repeating a command.
Repeating a command without motivation for the dog to comply. By repeating a command, the dog is taught to ignore your words because they mean nothing.

3) “You want to go bye, bye don’t you?”

Mistake number one: Humanizing the dog.
Assuming the dog knows what this statement means is humanizing the dog. When we speak to our dog in this fashion the dog hears, “wa, wa, wa, wa”
again, this teaches that words mean nothing.

Mistake number two: Putting a command in the form of a question.
Dog’s do not understand questions and commands should never be given in the form of a question. This statement is not a command as stated above.

4) The final and most devastating command, “GET OVER HERE NOW!” in an angry tone.

Mistake number one: Yelling at a dog.
Yelling at the dog to come to you is the most detrimental thing a person can do to the learning process. The person is teaching the dog NOT to come to him. You should never yell at, spank, slap or punish your dog in any way once he comes to you. By yelling at a dog after he comes, you are punishing him for coming to you. By yelling to get the dog to comply, you are creating a negative association with your dog coming to you. The dog will be less likely to come in the future.

Mistake number two: Again, not a command. Too many words used that the dog clearly cannot understand.

There are three stages when training a dog.

1) The learning stage
2) The reinforcing stage
3) The proofing stage

You have to complete one stage before you can move on to the next. Many training issues come from mistakes made in the learning stage of training.

The correct way for the man in the garage to handle this situation was to first properly teach the dog a solid recall and work on it daily. A dog without a solid recall should never be off leash. The man should be wearing a treat pouch, Rewards should be readily available when teaching a dog anything. If the man wants the dog to learn that the command “bye bye” means go to the car, he should teach the dog by saying the word “bye bye” and guiding the dog with a leash to the car, rewarding when he jumps in.

So you see, it is not the dog, it is the person who is failing the dog. Once you teach a dog to ignore your commands, You will have a more difficult time teaching them to listen in the future. Often times you will need a dog trainer to help. Remember the saying “Don’t blame me if you don’t train me”

By properly teaching your dog what words mean, and rewarding when the dog performs, you will have a dog that happily listens to you no matter what you say, in any situation.

The next time the neighbor wants his dog to go to the car it should sound like this,  “Trixie come” (dog comes) ,  “bye bye” – (dog jumps in car!)  4 simple words, no frustration.

To learn more training techniques and to keep from making common training mistakes, visit our website and purchase our book Puppy Montessori!

http://www.supermutts.com/puppy-montessori.html

Cindy Quigley is the Owner of Super Mutts Canine Retreat. She is a dog trainer, dog groomer, and author.  She has 19 years professionally working with dogs.

Puppy Montessori

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Following is an excerpt from our new book, now available on Amazon.  Puppy Montessori is a must read for any new puppy owner.  The Puppy Montessori program takes the guesswork out of the puppy raising process.

Happiness is a warm puppy. ~ Charles Schultz

Have you ever wondered how professional dog trainers have such well-behaved puppies or dogs? Many people say, “Of course, professional dog trainers know what to do.” That is true to an extent. The real reason is that professional dog trainers DO what they know. Having knowledge and following through with that knowledge are two different things. With the Puppy Montessori program, we are giving you a summary of the best tools that we, as professional dog trainers, use to train puppies. The rest is up to you. You now have in your hands the knowledge, but do you have the willingness to do it? The bottom line is, you can waste your time doing the wrong things, or you can do what works. The Puppy Montessori program is a proven puppy training system that works.

The reason for writing this book is threefold. First, as pet care professionals we see how many dogs end up in shelters across the country. Since many of these dogs have behavioral problems, we know that if they had been raised properly in their initial home, they would not be there. People often surrender dogs between six and nine months of age. Therefore, our number one goal in writing this book is to help keep dogs in their homes and out of shelters. Second, as dog trainers, we have seen dogs with behavioral problems that the owner causes unknowingly. The fact that people are human—and try to raise dogs as such—just does not work. Third, many of our clients could have avoided frustration and mistakes if only they had had a source for answers in the beginning.

Our commitment to this book is for the dog. “The dog,” an animal that we have brought into our world, has learned our language, can manipulate us in many ways, loves us unconditionally, and who by many people, is misunderstood. We also know that in helping the dog, we have to help the owner first. Humans cause most, if not all, behavioral problems in dogs; by helping one, you automatically help the other. People become more educated and dogs become more understood, creating a better dog/human bond, a lasting bond. In writing this book, we want people to realize that adopting a puppy is a very important step they need to take very seriously. Dogs are not disposable or inanimate. They are living, breathing creatures that depend on us to take care of them. They did not ask us to take them into our world. As a society, we owe it to dogs to do everything possible to understand them as what they are so we can provide them with everything necessary to grow and flourish as “dogs.” We need to remember that we are the ones with higher intelligence; with that comes great responsibility. It is our duty as caretakers. There are no excuses.

Congratulations on taking the first and most important step in your new puppy’s life, educating yourself on puppy. For most people, getting a puppy is a very exciting time and can be an extremely frustrating time. The excitement comes from having this little furry playful ball of cuteness in our presence. The frustration comes from not understanding what this ball of cuteness needs, really needs.

We have heard many complaints and frustrations from puppy owners regarding things such as potty training and destructive behaviors. In fact, all of these behaviors are not “bad” behaviors to the puppy but rather just a puppy “being” a puppy. The puppy Montessori program will give you all the tools to mitigate these so-called undesired behaviors and therefore establish “desired” behaviors with your puppy. This alone will help ease the majority of your frustration when it comes to raising a puppy.

We want to begin by saying that there is no EASY way to raise a puppy, and those who tell you they have an easy way to raise a puppy are lying. Raising a puppy takes time—lots of YOUR time and commitment. The puppy Montessori program will help make the puppy-raising process easier and less frustrating than if you do not use the program, but it will still take time and commitment on your part.

Just as you need to prepare your home and family for a new baby, you also need to prepare your home and family for a new “baby” dog. The Puppy Montessori program teaches you how to do just that. The Puppy Montessori program will give you the tools and knowledge needed to make the puppy experience an enjoyable one for both you and your new puppy. This program will enable you to set a foundation to grow your puppy into a well-adjusted, well-mannered, stable adult dog.

The Puppy Montessori program is a resource that you can go to when you have questions about leadership, feeding, potty training, socialization, vaccinations, toys, treats, obedience, destructive behaviors, leash walking, and much more. By purchasing this book, you have taken the first and most important step in building a relationship with your new best friend. By reading and utilizing the techniques described in this book, you will be able to enjoy your puppy and realize that it does not have to be such a tiresome, frustrating experience.

Purchase your copy today!

How to save on your dogs dental cleanings

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If you have a dog there will come a time when your Veterinarian tells you that he/she needs a dentistry.  Then they will hand you the bill.

 Owning a pet care business that offers grooming, we see many pet parents neglecting their dogs dental hygiene.  We are often told that the main reason for this is due to the price of dentistry.  We have clients that have been told that their dogs dentistry bill will run anywhere from $300 to $2000.  Dog dentistry is recommended by many veterinarians once a year.

Sadly, when a pets teeth are neglected it will lead not only to bad breath but also to gum disease.  This will cause painful teeth and the loss of teeth.  If left untreated for years, tartar buildup can also lead to heart and kidney problems which can shorten your pets life.

 Fortunately, there are a few things you can do to help prevent tartar buildup on your pets teeth, therefore minimizing or totally eliminating the need for a dentistry.

Daily brushing of your pets teeth will help minimize tartar buildup and is recommended by most veterinarians.  we have found that brushing alone is not as effective as providing your pet with an all natural beef shank, knuckle or for small dogs, knee cap bone.  Canines in the wild naturally chew bones, it aids in teeth cleaning.    In our experience, the chewing of bones get areas of your pets teeth clean that brushing  alone cannot.  Dogs put a large amount of pressure on their rear teeth when chewing a bone which helps chip away at the tartar.   Providing your pet with chew toys and dental chews will also help.  However, we have seen remarkable results using a product called Petzlife oral care gel. http://astore.amazon.com/wwwsupermutts-20/detail/B009T6KT20

Years ago we lived with a pack of 4 large dogs.   We started using Petzlife oral care gel twice daily applying a liberal amount with our finger on each side of the dogs mouth.  After two weeks, we saw improvement in the amount of tartar on the older dogs and a marked improvement in the bad breath.   At the three week mark, we gave our dogs large beef knuckle bones to chew on.  http://astore.amazon.com/wwwsupermutts-20/detail/B002FYXEDE.  The next day we checked our pets teeth and to our surprise, the dogs with tartar buildup had a large decrease in tartar.  On one dog the tartar was completely gone! (Yes, completely).  This sold us on the product and we started recommending it to all of our clients.  Some of our clients stated that that they did not see a difference. When questioned about the procedure, it was clear they did not follow with the twice daily treatments or their dog was not one to chew on bones.

Here are our recommendations;

  • If your dog is young or does not have tartar buildup, brush teeth daily with an approved toothpaste for dogs  such as Petrodex enzymatic toothpaste.  http://astore.amazon.com/wwwsupermutts-20/detail/B00025K0R6.  You should also start using Petzlife oral care gel once daily or every few days to help prevent tartar from forming.
  • Provide your dog with a natural beef bone daily.  We are not suggesting you give your pet bones from the table.   These can be brittle and splinter and can lodge in your pets intestines.  Never give a pet cooked bones of any kind.   We recommend purchasing them from your local pet or feed store.  As stated above, they come in Shank, Knuckle, Femur or Knee cap.  We will  provide links below to each type of bone that we recommend.
  • If your dog has tartar buildup, purchase petzlife oral care gel and apply liberally, twice daily for three weeks.  After three weeks give your pet a bone to chew on.  Check the teeth daily and continue applying petzlife until the tartar is gone.

Some owners state that their pet does not chew on bones or chew toys.  We have yet to find a pet that will not chew on the beef bones listed above.  However, if your dog will not chew bones, the Petzlife representative recommends brushing your pets teeth after the 3 week period and to manually try to remove the tartar with your finger.

If you do not like to give your pet real bones, you may try one of the Nylabone durachews on the market  http://astore.amazon.com/wwwsupermutts-20/detail/B005A3FEGW  If you start giving your pet bones from puppyhood, when they are teething and automatically chew, they will generally continue throughout their life.

There are some that say you should not give your dogs bones.  We believe this is based on the thought that people use to give bones from the kitchen table or cooked bones.  These bones are generally small and can splinter, get caught in your pets throat, or cause intestinal blockage.   Dogs have large teeth made for chewing.  Wild dogs chew on bones after eating.  It is natural for dogs to chew.  Chewing bones strengthens gums, cleans and sharpens teeth and dogs enjoy doing it.  The bones we are recommending are thick bones that do not splinter and cannot be chewed up in a short period of time.  These bones last for months in our house (and we have powerful chewers).  For 15 years we have been giving our dogs and our clients dogs these bones with only one incident of a broken tooth.    Since implementing this system, we had a  female Ridgeback mix who lived to be 13 years old and a Boxer that lived to be 9.  They never needed a dentistry.  Our current dogs, a Boxer and English bulldog are 8 and 6 years old, have no tartar and also have never needed a dentistry.  The Veterinarian always says their teeth look great!

Once the tartar is removed from your pets teeth, you can then provide bones to chew on periodically for maintenance.  If you notice tartar beginning to form, you can start using  Petzlife oral gel again.  This is a system that has worked for us and has maintained our pets dental health without a lot of costly dental bills.

All of these products can be found on our website at http://astore.amazon.com/wwwsupermutts-20 and are shipped through Amazon.

Links

Beef shank bone  – http://astore.amazon.com/wwwsupermutts-20/detail/B00AEDY64E

Beef Knuckle bone – http://astore.amazon.com/wwwsupermutts-20/detail/B002FYXEDE

Beef Femur bonehttp://astore.amazon.com/wwwsupermutts-20/detail/B000633NXM

For small dogs: Beef kneecaphttp://astore.amazon.com/wwwsupermutts-20/detail/B003XRN54K

Nylabone Durachewhttp://astore.amazon.com/wwwsupermutts-20/detail/B008A3TE8I

Petzlife oral gelhttp://astore.amazon.com/wwwsupermutts-20/detail/B009T6KT20